New Zealand Stamps

New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare


New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare
New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare
New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare
New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare
New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare

New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare    New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare

This stamp is INVERTED and is: Extremely Scarce: (as noted by many dealers & stamp auctioneers) Be the first to own this extremely scarce and unique stamp. The World's first action-replay stamp' Note: To see the action replay on a New Zealand olympic stamp from this issue go to Youtube. Type in "New Zealand Post Olympic Lenticular Stamps" and you will see a 15 second video of the action replay.

Watch it a few times so you can see the movement. Definitely something to talk about.

American Philatelic Society Certificate of Authenticity Number 205838 (Dated: 12/17/2013) New Zealand, Gibbons No. 2730a, lenticular 3-D image inverted, unused, on original backing, genuine in all respects.

This stamp is very unique , because of the following: 1. It is a Olympic stamp.

It is a type of hologram stamp as noted: The technology behind this action stamp is as follows: The effect of movement is created through a special printing process called Lenticular. This effect is achieved by two or more images being printed together, or'inter-laced', into each other. These are printed around the wrong way on the back of a special lens material.

Due to the optics in the lens, your eye is forced to see only a very small area of the lens at a certain angle. So, when you tilt the stamp, the images in the stamp appear to move. Cannot be duplicated or forged.

(read Historical Note below) 4. The world's first action-replay stamps. (see note below) The following article is from Linn's Stamp News, Sidney, Ohio. This article first appeared as part of the World of New Issues section of Linns Stamp News, September 6, 2004. Linns Stamp News, Sidney, Ohio.

New Zealand added a new twist to its stamps commemorating the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. The athletes on the stamps appear to move when the stamps are flipped back and forth.

New Zealand Post claims that these are the worlds first action-replay stamps , as it calls them. The new issue announcement says, When we remember our Olympic champions, we often recall the moments, or the split seconds, when they gritted their teeth and rose to the superhuman tasks of becoming Olympic champions.... With the twist of a wrist these split seconds of extraordinary human endeavor can be replayed. The oldest scene shown on the stamps is Yvette Williams winning the gold medal in long jump at the 1952 Helsinki Games.

Williams, the first New Zealand woman to win a gold, is commemorated on the 90¢ denomination. Two other stamps in the set also capture track and field athletes in action. Set of four stamps commemorating the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. The stamps were produced by the lenticular process which combines multiple digital images viewed with a special lens material to create an animated effect. 17 Philateli-Graphics, April 2004 then printed wrong-reading directly to the back of the lens.

Due to the optics designed into the lens, your eye is forced to see only a very small area of the lens at a certain viewing angle. The process dates to the 1930s, and one popular application was on prizes in boxes of Cracker Jack. The athletes honored on the stamps helped to unveil them August 2 at a ceremony in Wellington.

Williams said that New Zealand Post had considered placing her on a stamp even before she won the gold medal. It was first proposed back in 1950 that I be on a stamp, but the New Zealand Amateur Athletics Association said no, that it would impinge on my status as an amateur athlete. Walker said of his appearance on the stamp, This is just a big-time wow.

Its absolutely awesome, the ultimate recognition. This spectacular error was found in a local Hamilton post office and it is believed that only a single pane of 16 was issued. The current error was found shortly after release and once NZ Post heard of this problem, the remaining stamps were withdrawn from circulation. This error has been extensively written up in the NZ Stamp Collector publication Royal Philatelic Society of New Zealand, Vol.

The RPSNZ Expert Committee advised that "yes" it was "genuine" and that it was almost certainly cannot be forged in any way. Also any attempt to recreate this variety, which would involve removing the laminate and re-attaching it upside down would not reproduce the left shift (which is very distinctive of this error) or the perforations of the genuine invert... With one stamp in the New Zealand National Museum.

The actual quantity is unknown. Note: Based on the scarcity and availability, I have priced this stamp accordingly, which may be low based on the quantity available. Image is of the actual stamp. The item "New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare" is in sale since Tuesday, May 03, 2016.

This item is in the category "Stamps\United States\Errors, Freaks, Oddities". The seller is "tasmanianman" and is located in Orem, Utah. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  1. Topic: Olympics
  2. Year of Issue: 2004
  3. Country/Region of Manufacture: New Zealand
  4. Quality: Mint Never Hinged/MNH
  5. Color: Multi-Color
  6. Denomination: 2 Dollars


New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare    New Zealand 2730a (2004) $2 OLYMPIC Stamp INVERTED CENTER withCert Scarce/Rare